Welcome to Duke.
We work on the
weird and wonderful.

If your electrical equipment is more of a pain in the ass than an asset, it’s time to call Duke.

We like to say we work on the weird and wonderful. We can rebuild a 50 year-old DC motor that’s impossible to find parts for but critical to a million dollar piece of equipment. Troubleshoot the failed generator on an ocean-going freighter that was supposed to leave port yesterday. From reverse engineering a motor to replace a legacy product that’s no longer available to supplying brake parts to keep the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ dams from leaking, Duke has done it.

There’s dirt under our fingernails, but we still consider it art.

If we added up the years of experience at Duke, we’d be into our third century. Times have changed—it’s less about hands on the tools and more about technology now—but we still approach each job the same way. It’s an art. It takes skill, patience, imagination and a kind of fierceness to do it well.

Duke Electric technician repairing motor
Engineer at work

Our promise: We’ll service the hell out of you.

The last thing we want to be is a vendor. We want to be a partner—someone who tells you straight what’s going on and solves the problem, fast. If you need the part at 6 a.m. on a Saturday, we’ll get it to you.

If you can’t afford more than 24 hours of downtime, we’ll work ‘round the clock. If you aren’t familiar with the equipment, we’ll teach you everything we can.

Technician accessories
Straps and gear
Industrial equipment accessories
Technician Workstation

We’re like outside experts working on the inside.

We joke with some of our customers that we know their plant better than they do. It feels good to help a plant manager increase production, a maintenance manager increase reliability, a purchaser get the best price or an engineer solve an automation problem. We know what you’re looking for and deliver it—good advice, quality work, premier products and respect for your dollar.

They called him “The Duke.”

“The Duke” Raab (who got his nickname from his signature bow tie) started Duke Electric in 1933. The company may have been founded on blood—it’s in the hands of the third generation now—but what makes it strong is the brains and sweat of every person who’s put their hands on the tools in our shop.

Stop swearing at the equipment.